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How Well do You Know Your History?

Vande Meulin Group walking across lawn on The Hill
In Search of History…
I belong to a private facebook group where we are trying to reconnect to family members all over the world. As new members join, they share the bit of family history that they know. As other closer relatives respond to them, identifying their common bond through that branch of the family tree, there is a palpable joy and excitement to feel connected with one’s kin. There happens to be some on the European continent, some in central America, some in South America, but most in the Caribbean.
We hope you will feel similar excitement as you piece together snippets of history which might resonate with you because of your family connections.  As you become engaged with the information here, if you read anything which links your family’s history, or that of your village, your town, or your province to Canadian History, we would love to hear from you.

Continue reading “How Well do You Know Your History?”

Celebrate… and take action too

Do you love Canada? Of course you do!

How much do you know about its Christian foundations? A little? A lot?

Do you want to know more? Visit www.christianrootscanada.org to get the right tools for learning more.

First, you need to understand that Canada was NEVER a Christian nation.

However, it was founded by people with a strong Biblical worldview, and others who were greatly influenced by that worldview through their upbringing in a Christian home.

That was responsible for a Christian cultural outlook which pervaded the collective thought and actions of our early forebears well into the early 1980’s.

The Biblical virtues of truth, fidelity, diligence, perseverance, a strong work ethic, knowledge and respect for the guiding hand of God, all contributed to a culture that practiced (among other ideals) liberty without license, justice without coercion and equality before the law. These laws were rooted and grounded in British Common Law, most of which were derived from the Ten Commandments in the Bible.

ChristianRoots Canada will help you to understand where we came from as a nation, to chart how our national culture got where it is today, and to figure out what we can do to lift up God’s standard of justice, righteousness and truth.

We plan to equip you by giving you the tools you need to educate and inform your family, friends and neighbours about our Biblical Christian heritage.

Once you have those tools, we hope you will take the next step of impacting the culture, one home, one village, one Township, one Province or Territory at a time, until the Biblical Christian standard, God’s standard, becomes the culture of Canada once more.

Many Christians express the despair that David did in Psalm 10, (https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Psalm+10) when they look at our current political climate and our leaders. If that describes you, then there is hope.

YOU can do something about it.

You can arm yourselves with information at: www.christianrootscanada.org.   

Our journey first started as ChristianGovernance, seven or eight years ago, with Teaching Canadian History from a Biblical perspective. We have  hit the RESUME button as ChristianRoots Canada. There will be bumps and hiccups along the way. We hope that you will be patient with us.

Our mission is to Educate, Equip and Empower our readers to take action.

We hope you will be inspired by the stories of the Christian heroes that have gone before us and that you would boldly stand on their shoulders.  

If this information does not interest you, then please unsubscribe so you would not get any more communication from us.

If you think someone you know should be getting this information, then please share and forward.

Arm Yourselves. Rebuild the foundations.

Remember Psalm 11:3 – If the foundations are destroyed, what can the righteous do?

Coming Soon…

ChristianRoots Canada is a very young organization. As we grow and change , we will inform you when we introduce anything new. So here’s what’s new…

We are making baby steps into the foray of podcasting. Here’s the first one for you. Please share it with your friends and watch for the next REAL podcast.

Next step… Videos.

We have set up our YouTube channel and will be posting soon.

 

What’s useful about studying history?

History for many children and teenagers is considered, at the very least, a dull enterprise. At the most, it is the stuff of nightmares to teach and listen to. It is also one of the more forgotten courses to teach. A busy homeschooling mother may be inclined to just teach math, English, and science. Afterall history is not inherently useful for the education of a child. Or is it?

I understand this dilemma. History takes skill to teach well. It takes passion and ability to bring the collection of dates, facts, and people from the past to life. In my undergrad days, I myself was subjected to the endless drone of information from a dull history professor. It took copious amounts of coffee to stay awake for those classes, especially as finals approached.

But in the end, history is very useful to teach. Speaking from personal experience it has helped me learn to analyze facts and information. You see, history is not just about rote memorization. History is much more about interpreting the facts that letters, pictures, books, artifacts, paintings, etc. tell us. History is like being Sherlock Holmes. We are given certain facts and we have to derive the story, the interconnections, the networks, from all those facts. History is not simply saying that Canada became a country in 1867. History is interested in finding out: What is Canada? Why did it become a country? Why did that happen in 1867? How did that happen? Who was all involved? How did that affect the British Empire? How did Canada work to become one unified country? How was Canada planning to defend its vast territory?

And so history is really about learning to ask questions. It is learning to ask good questions. It is about learning to develop critical thinking skills. It is learning to make strong arguments about why events happen. It is learning to recognize that there is a vast array of networks in the world. Indeed, this was probably one of the most valuable lessons I have learned from studying history. An event doesn’t just happen because of one circumstance. For example, the exile of the Acadians in 1756 was not simply about the British having a grudge against the French. The Acadian Exile was about loyalty to the monarch, empire defense, and Roman Catholicism vs. Protestantism. Indeed, the Acadian exile was prompted by the French building up their Atlantic fortress at Louisbourg and encouraging the Acadians to rise up in rebellion to their “cruel” British oppressors.

In addition, history helps develop imagination, creativity, and character.  I spent many days in my childhood running around in the backwoods pretending I was a British soldier squashing the American invasion of Canada in 1812. Other days, I was with David Thompson exploring and mapping the great plains of Rupert’s Land. Other days I was facing the difficulties of being a pioneer in a land hostile to European settlement. Aside from the fact that I almost had my eyes pocked out twice with sticks by two unnamed brothers, those adventures were very important in the development of character.

Continue reading “What’s useful about studying history?”

Why Study Canadian History?

 

1867.

2017.

That’s 150 years of Canadian history. To be clear, that’s 150 years of post-Confederation Canadian history. Canada has centuries, even millennia, of history prior to that. There’s the history of the native people of Canada. There’s archeological and manuscript evidence of a Norse settlement from 1000 A.D. In the Age of Exploration English, Dutch, Basque, Portuguese, and French explorers sailed and landed on Canadian shores. Eventually the French and the English would colonize North America. After centuries of exploration, settlement, wars, rebellions, invasions, and colonization the Northern part of North America would become a country in 1867.

Yet, hardly anybody knows Canadian history. When you mention Canadian history to most Canadians they let out a sigh and say “Canadian history is so boring and dull. What’s there to study?”

That’s a really sad thing.

We live in a culture and a nation that knows little of its history, its foundations, its battles, its wars, its adventures, its sins, and its triumphs. But the saddest thing is that we as a nation have turned our backs on our Christian heritage, our strikingly Christian heritage.

We also live in a post-Christian nation that is hostile to the moral principles of our past. We live in a culture that mocks the non-inclusive ethical principles of our forefathers. We live in a hypocritical nation that begs forgiveness for the transgressions of past sins, without examining the sins of the current generation.

So, to be honest, when July 1, 2017, rolled around, I was not in a very patriotic mood. From my perspective here in Edmonton, Alberta, there was very little emphasis on the part of the Canadian government to celebrate Canada’s history (a giant yellow rubber duck??!). Without a history what is there to celebrate?

But that wasn’t the real reason for my lack of patriotic spirit. The real reason was that Canada is a nation that deserves God’s severe and righteous judgment for sin. Canada is very sadly a nation that rejoices in depravity and vile wickedness. What kind of sins? Continue reading “Why Study Canadian History?”